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Diabetic Recipe: Red Velvet Cupcakes with Cream Cheese Frosting

If you look at the Red Velvet Cupcakes pictured below, one thing pops out at you: the rich cream cheese frosting. There is about the same amount of cream cheese frosting atop these red velvet cupcakes as there is cupcake, itself. And for diabetics, that spells danger, with a capital D! There\\\'s more sugar and fat in the frosting than there is in the cupcake; however, there\\\'s one super simple way to turn this otherwise sinful dessert into a diabetes-friendly one, and that is simply to limit the amount of frosting that you spread atop each red velvet cupcake. (And a few other tricks, read on for more tips on how you can transform any dessert into one fit for a diabetic without hurting the integrity of the recipe.)

If you look at the Red Velvet Cupcakes pictured below, one thing pops out at you: the rich cream cheese frosting. There is about the same amount of cream cheese frosting atop these red velvet cupcakes as there is cupcake, itself. And for diabetics, that spells danger, with a capital D! There's more sugar and fat in the frosting than there is in the cupcake; however, there's one super simple way to turn this otherwise sinful dessert into a diabetes-friendly one, and that is simply to limit the amount of frosting that you spread atop each red velvet cupcake. (And a few other tricks, read on for more tips on how you can transform any dessert into one fit for a diabetic without hurting the integrity of the recipe.)

Ingredients

For the cupcakes:

  • 7 3/4 oz all-purpose flour (baking is an exact science, weighing flour is better than measuring!)
  • 3/4 tsp baking soda 
  • 3/4  tsp salt 
  • 3/4 tsp unsweetened cocoa powder 
  • 3/4  cups canola oil 
  • 4 1/2  oz granulated sugar (diabetics feel free to substitute with Splenda or Truvia)
  • 3/4 cups nonfat buttermilk 
  • 2 eggs

Directions

1 tbsp plus 1 tsp red food coloring

  • 3/4 tsp vinegar (white or apple cider can both work) 
  • 3/4 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/16 cup water

For the cream cheese frosting:

  • 3/4 lb cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1/2 lb butter, room temperature 
  • 1 lb powdered sugar, sifted (diabetics make your own using Splenda, run it in the blender or food processor until desired consistency)
  • 1/2 tbsp vanilla extract

For the cupcakes:

Preheat oven 350 degrees F.

Sift together flour, baking soda, salt, and cocoa powder into a bowl and set aside.

In a mixer fitted with paddle attachment, mix oil, sugar, and buttermilk until combined. Add eggs, food coloring, vinegar, vanilla and water and mix well. Add the dry ingredients a little bit at a time and mix on low, scraping down sides occasionally, and mix until just combined. Be sure not to over mix, or the batter will come out tough.

Line a muffin tin with 8 paper liners, scoop the batter into the liners and bake at 350 degrees F for 20 to 30 minutes or until the toothpick comes out clean. Let cool.

For the cream cheese frosting:

Whip the butter and cream cheese together in a mixer fitted with a paddle attachment until creamed. Gradually add powdered sugar to the mixture and scrape down the bowl as needed. Add the vanilla and mix until combined.

The frosting can be used right away, or stored in the refrigerator up to a week.

Frost cooled cupcakes with the cream cheese frosting. <- Completely disregard this last step if you're having trouble keeping tight control of your diabetes! It is unnecessary to frost cupcakes. Who said you can't eat cake without frosting? On the other hand, if you've got tight control of your diabetes and would like a little frosting with your red velvet cupcake, by all means, frost a thin layer of cream cheese frosting over the red velvet cupcakes, only!

Note: Diabetics can transform any dessert into a diabetes-friendly one just by limiting the amount of sugar that goes into the making of the recipe without compromising the flavor or integrity of the recipe. For example, if a recipe calls for 1 cup of sugar, and if you can't substitute Splenda for granulated sugar, then only use 3/4 of a cup of the real sugar the recipe calls for. You can do yourself a tremendous favor by only eating half a portion of the final product, as well. It can be so easy to eat well, even if you're eating dessert.

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